Posted by: dlip | January 20, 2008

Stroke Advice


Stroke Warning Signs

If you notice one or more of these signs, don’t wait. Stroke is a medical emergency. Call 9-1-1 or your emergency medical services. Get to a hospital right away! The American Stroke Association wants you to learn the warning signs of stroke:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden, severe headache with no known cause

Be prepared for an emergency.

  • Keep a list of emergency rescue service numbers next to the telephone and in your pocket, wallet or purse.
  • Find out which area hospitals are primary stroke centers that have 24-hour emergency stroke care.
  • Know (in advance) which hospital or medical facility is nearest your home or office.

Take action in an emergency.

  • Not all the warning signs occur in every stroke. Don’t ignore signs of stroke, even if they go away!
  • Check the time. When did the first warning sign or symptom start? You’ll be asked this important question later.
  • If you have one or more stroke symptoms that last more than a few minutes, don’t delay! Immediately call 9-1-1 or the emergency medical service (EMS) number so an ambulance (ideally with advanced life support) can quickly be sent for you.
  • If you’re with someone who may be having stroke symptoms, immediately call 9-1-1 or the EMS. Expect the person to protest — denial is common. Don’t take “no” for an answer. Insist on taking prompt action.

Source: http://americanheart.org

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Responses

  1. […] Read the rest of this great post here […]

  2. More stroke advice taken from a caregivers’ website.
    How do I know someone is having a stroke?

    Here are a few pointers. However,
    it would be good to try and memorise the following lists of symptoms:

    Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg – especially on one side of the body
    Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
    Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
    Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
    Sudden severe headache with no known cause
    Our friends at stroke.org also recommend the following simple test called Act F.A.S.T.:

    F = FACE Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

    A = ARMS Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

    S = SPEECH Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Does the speech sound slurred or strange?

    T = TIME If you observe any of these signs, it’s time to call 9-1-1 or get to the nearest stroke center or hospital.

    How can I prevent stroke?

    The National Stroke Association recommends:

    1. Know your blood pressure. If it is elevated, work with your doctor to keep it under control. High blood pressure is a leading cause of stroke. Have your blood pressure checked at least once each year – more often if you have a history of high blood pressure.

    2. Find out if you have atrial fibrillation (AF). If you have AF, work with your doctor to manage it. Atrial fibrillation can cause blood to collect in the chambers of your heart. This blood can form clots and cause a stroke. Your doctor can detect AF by carefully checking your pulse.

    3. Stop Smoking. Smoking doubles the risk for stroke. If you stop smoking today, your risk for stroke will begin to decrease.

    4. Drink alcohol in moderation. Having one drink each day may lower your risk for stroke (provided that there is no other medical reason you should avoid alcohol). 5. Lower your cholesterol. If your cholesterol is high, work with your doctor to control it.

    6. Control your diabetes. If you are diabetic, follow your doctor’s recommendations carefully.

    7. Exercise. A brisk walk, swim or other exercise activity for as little as 30 minutes a day can improve your health in many ways, and may reduce your risk for stroke.

    8. Enjoy a lower sodium (salt), lower fat diet. By cutting down on sodium and fat in your diet, you may be able to lower your blood pressure and, most importantly, lower your risk for stroke.

    9. Circulation problems? If so, work with your doctor to control them.

    10. If you have any stroke symptoms, seek immediate medical attention.

    adapted from http://carestation.agis.com


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